Hello.

I am Paul Kinlan.

A Developer Advocate for Chrome and the Open Web at Google.

Material colour pallette

Paul Kinlan

This is more for my own future reference and noodling with. I converted it from the aco file with https://github.com/websemantics/Color-Palette-Toolkit Pomegranate #f44336 Lavender blush #ffebee Pastel Pink #ffcdd2 Sea Pink #ef9a9a Sunglo #e57373 Burnt Sienna #ef5350 Cinnabar #e53935 Persian Red #d32f2f Tall Poppy #c62828 Thunderbird #b71c1c Vivid Tangerine #ff8a80

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Paul Kinlan

Trying to make the web and developers better.

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Service Worker Routing

Paul Kinlan

Yesterday I posted about an update to my Service Worker caching strategy. If you look at my ServiceWorker you will see that there is more to it than just the fix I had to make for storing data in the Cache. I have also introduced a URL routing framework to simplify my logic in the service worker when dealing with different kinds of requests. For example, I don’t want to cache requests to Google Analytics or Disquss, and rather than make my onfetch handler a lot more complex, it was easier to be declarative about the routes that I wanted to manage and then control the logic for those independently from the other routes.

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My blog's Service Worker and Caching Strategy Part 2

Paul Kinlan

About 5 months ago I documented my Service Worker caching strategy and it was noted that it wouldn’t work in Firefox because of my use of waitUntil. It was also noted that, well, my Service Worker didn’t actually work. It worked for me or so I thought, but every so often on a new page you could see it error and then quickly re-fetch from the network. I made a number of changes to make the code more readable, however I didn’t solve the actual issue and it turns out my understanding of cache.

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GRPC + Google Cloud: Cannot find module grpc_node.node

Paul Kinlan

This is a note for how to fix the above error because it annoyed me!

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Face detection using Shape Detection API

Paul Kinlan

I was at the party of the Chrome Dev Summit and Miguel Casas-Sanchez on the Chrome team came up to me and said “Hey Paul, I have a demo for you”. Once I saw it, I had to get it into my talk. That API was the Shape Detection API that is currently in the WICG in an incubation and experimentation phase and is a nice incremental addition to the platform.

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Custom Elements: an ecosystem still being worked out

Paul Kinlan

I like Web Components. It has taken a long time to get here but things are moving in the correct direction with Safari shipping Shadow DOM and now landing support for Custom Elements. I’ve been thinking a lot recently about Web Components, that is custom elements, template, Shadow DOM and CSS variables, specifically I have been focusing some of my thoughts on custom element space and how this can play out on the web in the future because I believe there are lots of interesting possibilities with how the usage of them will evolve over time.

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Measuring the impact of autofill on your forms

Paul Kinlan

Autofill has a chequered history filled with what I believe is a mild case of FUD. Chrome for the longest time decided to ignore autocomplete=off on forms and fields because we believed that autocomplete provides a huge amount of value for users especially in the context of mobile. One of the problems is that is incredibly hard to measure how impactful autocomplete is to your site. There aren’t really any events that happens when “autocomplete” occurs, so how do you measure what you tell has happened?

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Some thoughts on the microbit

Paul Kinlan

It was my eldest son’s birthday the other day, and it was late in the evening on said Birthday and I thought “I will give my son the gift of learning how to program”. It worked as I expected, he looked at me, wrinkled his nose, and got back to playing Fifa sitting next to me whilst I smashed out a terrible game on the amazing microbit. My quick summary is that I think it is an amazing litle device for quickly starting programming and getting into programming with hardware.

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Waiting for an element to be created

Paul Kinlan

In my trials and tribulations to detect when a field has been autofilled, I need to create a shim for monitorEvents so that I can see the event life-cycle of that element and ultimately try to debug it. One thing that I found is that monitorEvents requires an element but for what I am doing I know that there will be an element with an id at some point but I don’t know when it will be created.

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Monitor all Events on an Element

Paul Kinlan

I’ve recently started researching autofill and what hints that browsers give to developers that they have automatically filled in a form field on the users behalf. Blink and WebKit browsers have a special CSS pseudo class that you can look at (more in another post), but firefox doesn’t. There must be some event!!! Chrome DevTools has a handy helper function called monitorEvents, you call it with an element as an argument and it will then log to the console all the events that happen on that element.

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Simple sharing on the web with navigator.share

Paul Kinlan

Many of you know that I am passionate about inter-app communications, specifically the action of sharing. One of the things that I have encouraged anyone who wants to do the next version of Web Intents to do is focus on a very small and specific use case. Well Good News Everybody. Matt Giuca on the Chrome team has been working on a simple API (Web Share) that has the potential to connect websites with native apps and also and it is in Chrome Dev Channel on Android to test.

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Use-cases for sockets API on the web

Paul Kinlan

Owen Campbell-Moore, one of Chrome’s PM’s for Progressive Web Apps and new APIs asked the following question, and instantly Surma (that is the only name we know for him) said “Sockets” @owencm Network connections. Like writing an SSH client as a PWA. — Surma (@DasSurma) August 12, 2016 I also threw in my two pennies, and Marcos Ceres asked for use-cases. @annevk @Paul_Kinlan @DasSurma @owencm I'd still be interested in a good list of fun things that people want to build but can't.

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The Headless Web

Paul Kinlan

Do we need a browser in the future?

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Automating Android screen recording and device framing

Paul Kinlan

I wrote about screen recording from Android a little while ago and whilst it is cool, I didn’t document anything of the process that I had to get it into the device frame and make the screen recordings look all “profesh”. The process in the past was pretty cumbersome, I would grab the screen recording using my script and then use Screenflow to overlay the video on the device frame and then do export that out to the mp4 followed by a quick bit of GIF hakery.

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The Lumpy Web

Paul Kinlan

Wrinkles, Crinkles and lumpy bits.

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Thoughts on the Credential Management API

Paul Kinlan

Entering usernames, emails, identifiers and passwords is a massive pain for users. It’s even worse on mobile as the use has to fiddle around with. Browsers have done a number of things over the years to help with this problem. We started with enhancing autofill across browsers by making it more intelligent, more secure but more importantly synchronised across browsers (so that if you enter data on your desktop it is available instantly on your mobile).

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An organizer's perspective on Progressive Web App Dev Summit

Paul Kinlan

TL;DR - Went well. Lots to learn.

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Ephemeral social or content networks

Paul Kinlan

If there is no one around to read your tweet, does it make a difference?

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Testing Podcast

Paul Kinlan

This is a test. It might not look like much but I have integrated WebTorrent streaming in to my blog and bit torrent URLs so that I can distribute content across the web without relying on my site. It does use the WebSeed BEP so that it always has an unchocked seed (my site). I am going to start experimenting a little more with this to see how to measure analytics etc.

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My blog's Service Worker and Caching Strategy

Paul Kinlan

Service Worker gives you control. Service Worker offers me as a developer great power and flexibility when creating sites and managing how I can make them fast and resilient to network issues. Because of the flexibility that the Service Worker API offers in terms of control over the network there are a lot of choices that you have to make when managing and this could be daunting the first time that you start to play with the API.

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